Usakhelauri wine

According to Wikipedia:

Usakhelauri is a naturally semi-sweet Georgian wine. The Usakhelauri grape, from which Usakhelauri red wine is made, is grown on the mountain slopes of the Lechkhumi, in western Georgia, mainly near the villages of Okhureshi, Zubi and Isunderi. These grapes are scarce and a limited amount of land is available, producing only around three tons of grapes each year, making them highly prized. They are the premier wine grape of Georgia. The name “Usakhelauri” means “nameless” in Georgian, which translates in meaning to a cross between “beyond words”, and “priceless” due to its exceptional, and unparalleled quality. In a very good year, there are only about 1,000 bottles produced in the country, mainly by Teliani Valley, and some by Telavi Wine Cellars. Because of this, its cost is quite high at more than US$50 per bottle, direct from the winery. Usakhelauri contains 10.5–12.0% alcohol.

Unfortunately, I haven’t tried it.

Georgian Jars Hold 8,000-Year-Old Winemaking Clues

jar

The researchers, including Patrick McGovern, analyzed pottery from sites in Georgia and found traces of substances, like tartaric acid, that are the chemical fingerprint of grapes. “If we see the tartaric acid, that shows that we have wine or a grape product,” McGovern says. The researchers are reporting their discovery this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The oldest of these jars came from 8,000 years ago. It’s the earliest artifact ever found showing humans consuming juice from the Eurasian grapes that are the foundation of today’s wine industry.

Full article on NPR.

The people at Gadachrili Gora, 20 km outside Tbilisi were the world’s earliest winemakers.
news.nationalgeographic.com

Georgian wine made it to the Guinness list as the oldest wine in the World.

#wine #history