Berikaoba

Once a year in the villages of Kakheti in eastern Georgia, men sew their own clothes. They cut lambskin leather and colorful ribbons; they make huge masks studded with pumpkin seeds to imitate horns and teeth.

Far away on the other side of Georgia in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region, men put on women’s clothes and dresses, braid their hair, and apply makeup. They then walk into the center of the village to celebrate and improvise a play.

This festival is called Berikaoba.

Adjaruli khachapuri

Adjarian (Acharuli/Adjaruli) khachapuri, in which the dough is formed into an open boat shape and the hot pie is topped with a raw egg and a pat of butter before serving.

Wine tasting

This wine comes from Kvevri, large earthenware vessels used for the fermentation, storage and ageing of traditional Georgian wine.

Playful stray dog

During a soccer game of local teams in Gori, a stray dog run into the field. The playful dog cheered up soccer players and fans alike.

via youtube.com

Man finds his dog in the streets of Tbilisi, three years after he lost it

The man lost his dog three years ago and received a phone call from a shop owner to let him know that a dog which looks a lot like his was laying in front of her shop. So, he made the trip and as he approaches, he is in disbelief, commenting that it really does look like him.

via reddit.com

Churchkhela

For 3 Georgian lari you can treat yourself with Churchkhela, Georgia’s most delicious dessert. In Tbilisi, on Leselidze street they sell all kinds of them. The original recipe calls for a walnut or hazelnut filling, dipped in a condensed grape juice. But, there also are a  variety of churchkhelas made of kiwi, pomegranate and honey as well as different sorts of Georgian wine.

Usakhelauri wine

According to Wikipedia:

Usakhelauri is a naturally semi-sweet Georgian wine. The Usakhelauri grape, from which Usakhelauri red wine is made, is grown on the mountain slopes of the Lechkhumi, in western Georgia, mainly near the villages of Okhureshi, Zubi and Isunderi. These grapes are scarce and a limited amount of land is available, producing only around three tons of grapes each year, making them highly prized. They are the premier wine grape of Georgia. The name “Usakhelauri” means “nameless” in Georgian, which translates in meaning to a cross between “beyond words”, and “priceless” due to its exceptional, and unparalleled quality. In a very good year, there are only about 1,000 bottles produced in the country, mainly by Teliani Valley, and some by Telavi Wine Cellars. Because of this, its cost is quite high at more than US$50 per bottle, direct from the winery. Usakhelauri contains 10.5–12.0% alcohol.

Unfortunately, I haven’t tried it.